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restoration & clean up

9/19/2019 (Permalink)

Walls

Open flooded walls, even if they appear undamaged, to prevent mold, odor, and structural decay later.

  • Remove water from the structure as rapidly as possible. Ventilate.
  • Remove baseboards, and cut holes in wallboard to drain uninsulated walls.
  • Remove the interior surface of insulated walls to a point above water height. Discard flooded drywall.
  • Undamaged paneling may be propped open or reinstalled after cleaning.
  • Remove and discard all wet fibrous insulation.
  • Clean out mud. Wall studs and plates may be sprayed with disinfectant (1 cup bleach/gallon water) to kill any existing mold and fungi.
  • Speed dry with dehumidifiers and fans.
  • Leave walls open until they have thoroughly dried, which may take up to a month.
  • Select replacement materials that will withstand future floods (such as rigid foam insulation, removable wainscoting, ceramic tile, etc.).

https://agrilifeextension.tamu.edu/solutions/water-damage-restoration-clean-up-checklist/

SERVPRO of Grand Prairie is here for all of your restoration needs. 

Cleaning after a water damage

9/19/2019 (Permalink)

Appliances and Equipment

Download and carefully review the publication, “Evaluating Water-Damaged Electrical Equipment,” by NEMA.org.

Furniture

Take furniture outdoors to clean.

  • Brush off mud. All parts (drawers, doors, etc.) should be removed. Remove or cut a hole in the back to push out stuck drawers and doors. Discard flooded padding.
  • Use commercial furniture-cleaning products designed for the type of material. Do not refinish or wax until thoroughly dry.
  • Dry slowly out of direct sunlight because sun will warp furniture. It may take several weeks to several months to dry.

Preventing Mold

Aggressively control mold in the weeks and months after the flood.

  • When power is available, continuously use air conditioning (or heat in winter) plus a dehumidifier, if possible, to remove humidity.
  • In an unair-conditioned home, open windows and use fans to circulate air.
  • Turn on electric lights in closets, and leave doors open to facilitate drying.
  • Try to reduce activities that add moisture to the indoor air, and use exhaust fans when cooking and bathing.

https://agrilifeextension.tamu.edu/solutions/water-damage-restoration-clean-up-checklist/

SERVPRO of Grand Prairie is here for all of your restoration needs. 

Hidden signs your house could have mold

9/18/2019 (Permalink)

Your bathroom exhaust fan is on the fritz

“Mold is a particularly common problem in bathrooms with inadequate ventilation”

A bathroom exhaust fan is an essential tool to keep toxic mold at bay—but it won’t work if it’s clogged or not running well. In fact, if it’s still steamy five to ten minutes after you get out of the shower, your fan isn’t circulating enough air. It may need to be cleaned or replaced with a unit that meets the square footage of your bathroom. Piotraut also suggests cleaning the walls regularly with a bleach solution or other mold-killing product.

Do your floors feel squishy?

You know to be concerned about a soft spot in your hardwood floor. If you can access the subfloor through a crawl space or a basement, check for moisture. If that’s not possible, you’ll have to pull up a section of flooring. It’s worth it: That moisture—and any mold growth— will eventually spread. “If the wood floor is rotted, then the whole flooring needs to be changed,” says Piotraut. “If the flooring is still in good condition and only has a small amount of mold, it can be removed with mold remover.”

https://www.rd.com/health/wellness/hidden-signs-of-toxic-mold/

SERVPRO of Grand Prairie is here for all of your remediation needs.

Water Damage Restoration & Clean Up

9/18/2019 (Permalink)

Make sure that everyone is out of danger of new flood crests, fire, and falling buildings. Assume flood water and flooded materials are contaminated.

Flood Insurance Claims

If you have flood insurance, contact your insurance adjuster immediately.

  • Begin cleanup, salvage, and drying as soon as possible. Do not wait for adjuster. Take photos for use as an inventory. All steps suggested on this page can be taken before an adjuster arrives.
  • Clean house so the adjuster can see the damage.
  • Keep damaged materials for proof of loss.
  • Leave a phone number where you can be reached when the adjuster arrives.
  • The adjuster will assess damages to the house. The owner should sign a proof of loss statement. Additional damage can be added when found.
  • Contact governmental offices for information.
  • If you do not have flood insurance, your homeowner’s insurance likely will not cover the loss. If the flood has been declared a federal disaster by the President, apply for assistance online at http://www.DisasterAssistance.govor by calling 1-800-621-FEMA(3362) or 1-800-462-7585 (TTY) for the hearing and speech impaired.

https://agrilifeextension.tamu.edu/solutions/water-damage-restoration-clean-up-checklist/

 SERVPRO of Grand Prairie is here for all of your restoration needs.

Long range planning

9/17/2019 (Permalink)

Long-range hurricane planning

Make sure your home meets or exceeds current model building codes for regions often impacted by hurricanes. You may also want to do the following: 

  • Talk with your family members about what to do in case of a hurricane. Designate an emergency meeting spot and have a plan for your pets.
  • Show adult and teen family members where electrical, gas and water shut-offs are – and how to turn them off. Make sure the proper tools are nearby.
  • Have a well-stocked first aid kit, flashlights and plenty of batteries.
  • Install impact-resistant windows.
  • Be sure your doors have at least three hinges and a deadbolt lock with a bolt at least 1 inch long.
  • Install permanent wood or metal stiffeners on your garage door. Or contact the door manufacturer about temporary supports you can easily attach and remove.
  • Make sure your roof covering and sheathing beneath it can resist high winds.
  • Consider replacing gravel and rock landscaping with mulch or shredded bark, which can be less deadly in high winds.
  • Trim trees and shrubbery. Pay particular attention to weak or dead branches that could fall on your home or your neighbor's home.
  • Decide how and where to secure your boat.
  • Install straps or additional clips to securely fasten your roof to the frame structure.
  • Learn the elevation level of your property (above or below sea level) and whether the land is flood-prone. This gives you a better idea of how your property might be affected by a storm surge or tidal flooding.
  • Identify levees and dams in your area and determine whether they pose a hazard to you.
  • Learn hurricane evacuation routes. Figure out ahead of time where to go and how you would get there if you needed to evacuate.

https://www.nationwide.com/hurricanes.jsp

SERVPRO of Grand Prairie is here for all of your restoration needs.

Evacuate

9/17/2019 (Permalink)

Evacuate under the following conditions:

  • If you are directed by local authorities to do so. Do so immediately (do not wait!) and be sure to follow their instructions.
  • If you live in a mobile home or temporary structure—such shelters are particularly hazardous during hurricanes (no matter how well fastened to the ground).
  • If you live in a high-rise building—hurricane winds are stronger at higher elevations.
  • If you live on the coast, on a floodplain, near a river, or on an inland waterway.
  • If you feel that you are in danger.

Have an arranged meeting place for your family in case you get separated! One of the biggest issues in hurricanes is not knowing if your loved ones are safe. Remember that cell phones may not work. You need to communicate ahead of time (like the “old” days)! 

Only return once the authorities declare it is safe. Avoid all flood waters!  Never drive or walk on flooded roads.

https://www.almanac.com/content/how-survive-hurricane#

SERVPRO of Grand Prairie is here for all of your restoration needs.

FIRE SAFETY TIPS

9/16/2019 (Permalink)

FIRE SAFETY TIPS

Create and Practice a Fire Escape Plan

  1. Create and practice a home fire escape plan with two ways out of every room.
  2. As part of your plan, designate one person to get infants and small children out safely. Have a back-up plan for young children just in case the primary person is overcome by smoke.
  3. Smoke is toxic. Teach children to “get low and go” if there is smoke when they are leaving the home.
  4. Practice feeling the door, doorknob and cracks around the door with the back of your hand to see if they are too hot. Help your children practice this step.
  5. Choose a place to meet outside that is a safe distance away from your home.

https://www.safekids.org/tip/fire-safety-tips

SERVPRO of Grand Prairie is here 24 hours a day 7 days a week 365 days a year waiting to serve you!

Fire Safety Tips

9/16/2019 (Permalink)

Install Barriers Such as safety Gates Around Fireplaces, Ovens and Furnaces

  1. Make sure your fireplace is protected by a sturdy screen. Remember that glass screens can take a long time to cool down.
  2. If you are using a fireplace or wood stove, make sure you burn only seasoned hardwood such as oak, ash or maple.
  3. If small children live in or visit your home, use a safety gate around your fireplace or wood stove.

Blow Out Candles and Store Matches Out of reach

  1. Keep candles at least 12 inches away from anything that can burn, and always blow them out when you leave the room or before you go to sleep.
  2. Make a habit of placing matches, gasoline and lighters in a safe place, out of children’s reach. Avoid novelty lighters or lighters that look like toys.
  3. Teach kids never to play with matches and lightersMake a habit of placing these items up and away from young children.

https://www.safekids.org/tip/fire-safety-tips

SERVPRO of Grand Prairie is here for all of your restoration needs.

What to do in a Fire

9/16/2019 (Permalink)

Know What to Do in a Fire

  • Test any closed doors with the back of your hand for heat. Do not open the door if you feel heat or see smoke. Close all doors as you leave each room to keep the fire from spreading.  
  • Crawl low under smoke. Choose the safest exit. If you must escape through a smoky area, remember that cleaner air is always near the floor. Teach your child to crawl on her hands and knees, keeping her head less than 2 feet above the floor, as she makes her way to the nearest exit.  
  • Don't stop. Don't go back. In case of fire, do not try to rescue pets or possessions. Once you are out, do not go back in for any reason. Firefighters have the best chance of rescuing people who are trapped. Let firefighters know right away if anyone is missing.
  • Stop, drop, and roll! Cool and call. Make sure your child knows what to do if his clothes catch fire.
    • Stop! - Do not run.
    • Drop! - Drop to the ground right where you are.
    • Roll! - Roll over and over to put out the flames. Cover your face with your hands.
    • Cool - Cool the burned area with water.
    • Call - Call for help.

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/all-around/Pages/Fire-Safety.aspx

SERVPRO of Grand Prairie is here for all of your restoration needs.

After a Hurricane

9/7/2019 (Permalink)

After a Hurricane:

More deaths and injuries occur after a hurricane hits than during. This is because people are too anxious to get outside and survey the damage and come into contact with downed power lines or unstable trees. Follow these suggestions for staying safe after a hurricane:

  • Remain indoors until an official "all clear" is given.
  • Do not touch fallen or low-hanging wires of any kind under any circumstances. Stay away from puddles with wires in or near them. Do not touch trees or other objects in contact with power lines.
  • Use phones for emergencies onlyandcall 911 only for life-threatening situations.
  • Call police or utility companies immediately to report hazards such as downed power lines, broken gas or water mains, overturned gas tanks, or any other dangerous situation you come across.
  • Watch for weakened roads, bridges, tree limbs, porches that could collapse unexpectedly, and never drive through floodwaters of any level.
  • After power is restored, check refrigerated food for spoilage, which is the cause of much sickness two days to a week after the storm.
  • When reinstalling a cable base, TV, or satellite antenna, check all directions to be sure no power lines are nearby. The same goes for climbing trees to clear debris.
  • Do not operate charcoal grills, propane camping stoves, or generators indoors.

https://www.tripsavvy.com/staying-safe-during-hurricane-1513589

SERVPRO of Grand Prairie is here for all of your restoration needs.